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NEUROCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF COMMUNICATION - WHAT HAPPENS IN OUR SYSTEM WHEN WE COMMUNICATE



The concept of a safe space becomes crucial in co-creating conversations. Trust, a key element in fostering co-creation, activates various competencies, including strategic thinking, empathy, compassion, and foresight. Trust is associated with the prefrontal cortex, while distrust is linked to the amygdala, a part of the brain responsible for emotional processing.


The amygdala acts as a filter, categorizing stimuli as pleasurable or threatening, triggering the stress response in the case of a perceived threat. On the other hand, co-creating conversations that focus on collaborative problem-solving activates an appreciative mindset, turning off threat-based messages and engaging the prefrontal cortex. The prefrontal cortex plays a crucial role in making judgments, displaying empathy, and anticipating the future.


Oxytocin, often referred to as the "bonding hormone," becomes a critical catalyst in reinforcing positive patterns of engagement. It is produced in the brain by the hypothalamus and regulates neuroendocrine functions. The release of oxytocin is dependent on the excitation of neurons in the hypothalamus, highlighting the profound interplay between neurochemistry and the quality of our interactions.


In essence, understanding and harnessing the neurochemical aspects of communication can pave the way for more positive and transformative conversations, fostering deeper connections and collaborative problem-solving.

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